EastWesterly Review Home -- Blog -- EastWesterly Review -- Take2 -- Martin Fan Bureau -- Fonts a Go-Go -- Games -- Film Project -- Villagers -- Graveyard
Custom Search

EastWesterly
Review

Issues

38 | 37 | 36 | 35
34 | 33 | 32 | 31 | 30
29 | 28 | 27 | 26 | 25
24 | 23 | 22 | 21 | 20
19 | 18 | 17 | 16 | 15
14 | 13 | 12 | 11 | 10
9 | 8 | 7 | 6 | 5
4 | 3 | 2 | 1


   
Annual Conferences

23rd | 22nd | 21st | 20th
19th | 18th | 17th | 16th | 15th
14th | 13th | 12th | 11th | 10th
9th | 8th | 7th

Foundling Theory Fund

Letters from the editor

Submit your article

Links

Get e-mail when we update our site. Your e-mail:
Powered by NotifyList.com
help support us -- shop through this Amazon link!

© 1999-2016
Postmodern Village
e-mail * terms * privacy

Bean Newton's Prophetic Vision
by E.W. Wilder

Poets have long been confused for prophets and vice versa, but upon occasion, one runs across a poet who actually is the other as well.

Such was the case with Bean Newton.

In "Bean's Blank Page," the poet looks beyond the time of writing, probably shortly before his death in the fall of 1998, to a time just a few months distant, but a time one step closer to the Millennium, one step closer to the total societal collapse that Newton in other writings indicated would be confused by a populace become "fripperish and anile" for Armageddon.

The facts he may have gotten wrong, but the Zeitgeist he certainly didn't.

This poem is followed by a short piece, but one thematically linked, expressing Newton's deep anguish over the junk science and bad theory that still characterizes our media and our lives.

--E.W. Wilder, editor of the tentatively titled Bean Down So Goddamn Long, It Looks Like Lunch to Me: The Posthumous Works of Bean Newton.